By Shirley Samuels

Content material:
Chapter 1 nationwide Narrative and the matter of yank Nationhood (pages 7–19): J. Gerald Kennedy
Chapter 2 Fiction and Democracy (pages 20–30): Paul Downes
Chapter three Democratic Fictions (pages 31–39): Sandra M. Gustafson
Chapter four Engendering American Fictions (pages 40–51): Martha J. Cutter and Caroline F. Levander
Chapter five Race and Ethnicity (pages 52–63): Robert S. Levine
Chapter 6 classification (pages 64–74): Philip Gould
Chapter 7 Sexualities (pages 75–86): Valerie Rohy
Chapter eight faith (pages 87–96): Paul Gutjahr
Chapter nine schooling and Polemic (pages 97–107): Stephanie Foote
Chapter 10 Marriage and agreement (pages 108–118): Naomi Morgenstern
Chapter eleven Transatlantic Ventures (pages 119–130): Wil Verhoeven and Stephen Shapiro
Chapter 12 different Languages, different Americas (pages 131–144): Kirsten Silva Gruesz
Chapter thirteen Literary Histories (pages 147–157): Michael Drexler and Ed White
Chapter 14 Breeding and examining: Chesterfieldian Civility within the Early Republic (pages 158–167): Christopher Lukasik
Chapter 15 the yankee Gothic (pages 168–178): Marianne Noble
Chapter sixteen Sensational Fiction (pages 179–190): Shelley Streeby
Chapter 17 Melodrama and American Fiction (pages 191–203): Lori Merish
Chapter 18 tender limitations: Passing and different “Crossings” in Fictionalized Slave Narratives (pages 204–215): Cherene Sherrard?Johnson
Chapter 19 medical professionals, our bodies, and Fiction (pages 216–227): Stephanie P. Browner
Chapter 20 legislation and the yank Novel (pages 228–238): Laura H. Korobkin
Chapter 21 hard work and Fiction (pages 239–248): Cindy Weinstein
Chapter 22 phrases for kids (pages 249–261): Carol J. Singley
Chapter 23 Dime Novels (pages 262–273): Colin T. Ramsey and Kathryn Zabelle Derounian?Stodola
Chapter 24 Reform and Antebellum Fiction (pages 274–284): Chris Castiglia
Chapter 25 the matter of town (pages 287–300): Heather Roberts
Chapter 26 New Landscapes (pages 301–313): Timothy Sweet
Chapter 27 The Gothic Meets Sensation: Charles Brockden Brown, Edgar Allan Poe, George Lippard, and E. D. E. N. Southworth (pages 314–329): Dana Luciano
Chapter 28 Retold Legends: Washington Irving, James Kirke Paulding, and John Pendleton Kennedy (pages 330–341): Philip Barnard
Chapter 29 Captivity and Freedom: Ann Eliza Bleecker, Harriet Prescott Spofford, and Washington Irving's “Rip Van Winkle” (pages 342–352): Eric Gary Anderson
Chapter 30 New England stories: Catharine Sedgwick, Catherine Brown, and the Dislocations of Indian Land (pages 353–364): Bethany Schneider
Chapter 31 Harriet Beecher Stowe, Caroline Lee Hentz, Herman Melville, and American Racialist Exceptionalism (pages 365–377): Katherine Adams
Chapter 32 Fictions of the South: Southern pics of Slavery (pages 378–387): Nancy Buffington
Chapter 33 The West (pages 388–399): Edward Watts
Chapter 34 The outdated Southwest: Mike Fink, Augustus Baldwin Longstreet, Johnson Jones Hooper, and George Washington Harris (pages 400–410): David Rachels
Chapter 35 James Fenimore Cooper and the discovery of the yank Novel (pages 411–424): Wayne Franklin
Chapter 36 the ocean: Herman Melville and Moby?Dick (pages 425–433): Stephanie A. Smith
Chapter 37 nationwide Narrative and nationwide heritage (pages 434–444): Russ Castronovo

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T. Andrews. Winans, Robert (1975). ’’ Early American Literature 9, 268–75. Wood, Gordon S. (1972). The Creation of the American Republic, 1776–1787. New York: Norton. Wood, Sarah Sayward (1800). Julia, and The Illuminated Baron. A Novel: Founded on recent Facts Which have Transpired in the Course of the Late revolution of Moral Principles in France. Portsmouth, NH: Charles Peirce. Ziff, Larzer (1991). Writing in the New Nation: Prose, Print, and Politics in the Early United States. New Haven: Yale University Press.

The Plight of Feeling: Sympathy and Dissent in the Early American Novel. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Warner, Michael (1990). The Letters of the Republic: Publication and the Public Sphere in EighteenthCentury America. : Harvard University Press. Webster, Noah (1790). A Collection of Essays and Fugitive Writings on Moral, Historical, Political, and Literary Subjects. Boston: I. Thomas & E. T. Andrews. Winans, Robert (1975). ’’ Early American Literature 9, 268–75. Wood, Gordon S. (1972).

While a spokesman for democracy writing in the Gazette of the State of Georgia in 1789 called for the election of ‘‘a class of citizens [from] a humbler walk in life,’’ a New Englander writing in Boston’s American Herald in 1786 claimed such promotion of the ‘‘popular spirit’’ would only ensure that more ‘‘blustering, ignorant men’’ would seek election. This populist democracy (figured, for example, by ‘‘Rip Van Winkle’’’s ‘‘lean bilious looking fellow, with his pockets full of handbills . . haranguing vehemently about rights of citizens’’) was not what many leading American revolutionaries had anticipated, and hence (though it can still come as a surprise to our ears) a signatory of the Declaration of Independence like Elbridge Gerry could even be heard referring to democracy as ‘‘the worst of all political evils’’ (quoted in Shoemaker 1966: 83).

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